mardi 3 octobre 2017

Listening & Speaking Activity : BINGO


One of the classroom management tools that I use with my students is P.A.T., which I learned about from Fred Jones' "Tools for Teaching". You can visit his website here to learn more. 

Every week, my students earn time towards P.A.T., which we use to play an educational game in French. Each class starts the week with 10 minutes towards P.A.T. and whenever they save time by doing transitions quickly and quietly, they have an opportunity to earn more time for P.A.T. 


One of my favourite games to start off the year is BINGO. Not only do we review numbers and work our listening skills, but it's a great opportunity to introduce and practice new game vocabulary, turning this into a speaking game as well. The students play completely in French, with one of twelve interactive versions of BINGO that I have made for the Smartboard.

BINGO - Numbers 1 - 50 & 51 - 100 

I have two versions of the interactive BINGO for numbers: one with numbers from 1 to 50 and 1 with numbers from 51 to 100. I made cards to go with each game that are double-sided and have the numbers on one side and the word for the number in French on the other side. When we play the version with the words, students are now working their reading skills, as well as their listening skills. There are 30 cards for each version so I never have to worry about students having the same cards, which is nice.

Making BINGO a speaking activity

When we play BINGO, I use an anchor chart for common sayings in French while playing BINGO. Students are encouraged to talk to one another after I have called the letter and number. Students use the BINGO Poster if they need it to talk about how the game is going in French. They enjoy sharing how they are doing and I find that this poster helps to generate a lot of authentic talk. I also reward the class for speaking French during this time so they are highly motivated to talk. 

BINGO - Les sons

Another game of BINGO that I play with my students is BINGO - Les sons. I made 10 different BINGO games, each one focusing on a different sound in French. There are 24 words that I call that contain the sound of the game. Each card has exactly 25 spaces, with one free space. However, no two cards are the same and there are 30 different cards. Every card has all the words so students are very engaged as they listen to the word that I called and try to find it on their card. Students practice listening to targeted French sounds, practice reading those sounds, and also practice saying those sounds in a fun environment. These particular games build vocabulary and help to improve pronunciation in French. I use the same reference poster to facilitate conversations while we play BINGO - Les sons.

These are just some of the games that we play during P.A.T. each week but I find that BINGO is a lot more fun now that it is a speaking game as well as a listening game. My students seem to be more engaged during the whole process. To learn about other games that I do in my classroom, please check out the following blog post:


mercredi 27 septembre 2017

French Speaking Activity


A simple activity to get students talking and yet be accountable for listening is Les bâtons bavards. This is a really easy activity and can be applied to any speaking activity. The concept is that students start with either a blue Popsicle stick or a green one. When I first came up with this activity, I actually coloured a bunch of Popsicle sticks blue, green, and red. Then I realized that I could buy them at our local discount store and I have since bought them there. They come with extra colours buy I just stick to these three colours.

The concept is simple:
Students with the blue sticks will be responsible for speaking.
Students with green sticks will be responsible for listening - one of them will be chosen to share something that someone with a blue stick said.
Students who are off-task get a red stick. I allow my students the opportunity to turn things around and get rid of their red stick in exchange for either a good share or good listening (depending on which colour stick they have).

Often we will play "Deux vérité et un mensonge" (Two truths and a lie) and use Les bâtons bavards to help organize who will be speaking and who will be guessing the answers first. First we play as a whole class and half of the students get blue sticks and half of the students get green sticks. Students with the blue sticks tell the class two statements (usually about themselves) that are true, and one statement that is not true. After one student with a blue stick has shared, either that student will choose or I will choose a student with a green stick to guess which statement was a lie. If the student with the green stick correctly identifies (with a complete sentence) the lie statement, then those two students switch sticks. If the lie was not correctly identified, then a different student with a green stick will be chosen.

For example:
Student A (blue stick) : "J'aime la pizza. J'ai deux frères. Je n'aime pas la couleur verte."
Student B (green stick) : "Le mensonge est tu n'aimes pas la couleur verte."
Student A (blue stick) : "Oui, j'aime la couleur verte."
(exchange sticks)

I like this game because it allows students to prepare themselves to actively listen if they have green sticks, or to prepare themselves to speak if they have blue sticks. Red sticks are a visual reminder that you need to get back on track. It serves as an excellent opportunity to assess listening skills, especially since students know in advance who might be called on to answer. Once students are familiar with how this activity works, they can break off into two groups and I can go back and forth between the two groups.

Be sure to check out my blog post about Games in the French Classroom to learn more about what types of games I use and how I use them to get my students talking more. 

Also check out my Resources for Teachers section as I am always trying to add to my list of resources for French Teachers. 

French Writing Activity

A great activity to get students to practice writing is Une conversation écrite. A lot of the games that we do in my classroom focus on oral communication skills to give students a solid foundation. This activity is simple and easy to do. One of my English teaching colleagues suggested doing "Chatterlogs" but I couldn't think of a French equivalent, so I just call it "Une conversation écrite". That is essentially what it is. With a partner, students take turns asking and answering questions on paper. 

I like to pair to this activity with Questions au hasard, which is a speaking game where they are asking and answering questions. Once they have practiced saying those questions, then they can practice writing them. The game boards for that game are an excellent reference for this activity as they contain many different questions and forms of questions, as well as the answer stems. Students are also using their reading skills when they do this activity because they have to read their partner's questions so that they know what they are responding to. 
The template that I use is available on TpT as a FREE download. It has a spot for the students' names to go at the top, one beside each number: number 1 and number 2. Students then just write their number beside what they write so that I can clearly see who wrote what afterwards, without students having to rewrite their name each time they answer or ask a question.  
I have my students introduce themselves at the beginning of each Conversation écrite and after they have both introduced themselves, they take turns asking questions. One person asks a question. The partner must answer the question IN A COMPLETE SENTENCE * and then asks a new question. *You can have students extend their thinking by providing a reason using parce que. Another challenge that I give students is to respond to their partner's answer. For example: 
1 - Salut.
2 - Salut
1 - Je m'appelle Kurtis. Comment t'appelles-tu?
2 - Je suis Amanda. Quelle est ta couleur préférée?
1 - Ma couleur préférée est bleue. Est-ce que tu aimes le chiens?
2 - J'aime bleu aussi. Oui, j'aime les chiens parce qu'ils sont mignons. Quel est ton sport préféré?

I like that you can differentiate this activity by allowing students to use a reference sheet if they need it, or by having them extend their thinking. It's a simple but fun activity to do to practice their interaction écrite without having to use technology.




dimanche 3 septembre 2017

Strategies for Speaking French


I believe that a strong foundation in oral French is essential and that learning French should be fun. These beliefs are very evident in everything I do and that you see in my classroom.  In my classroom, there are many incentive-based strategies systems, which are used to encourage students to take risks. French is the language of communication in my French Immersion classroom. In order to build students confidence and ease in using French to communicate, there are a number of systems in place that promote risk-taking and communicating in French. Part of risk-taking is trying even when you don’t have the right answer and being okay with being wrong sometimes. With time, practice, patience and support, you can develop independence and confidence in your abilities. These systems are based on positive reinforcement and reward students for using French, for reminding others to speak French and for encouraging students to support others who need support in speaking French.



Les Billes - Marbles
This system rewards individuals for their efforts speaking French and the whole class as well. I have two containers in my classroom – one that is labelled La classe and another one that is labelled M. Hartnell. To begin, I fill the container labelled M. Hartnell with marbles (les billes). As students speak French, they can take one of my marbles and place it in the container labelled La classe. Students typically win between one and three marbles if they speak to me in French. Gradually, as the students speak more French, they take the billes from the teacher’s container to the classroom container. The goal is for them to transfer all of les billes to the classroom container. When this happens, there is a draw, where seven students are chosen at random to receive a prize from the prize box.  The amount of marbles they win is in direct relation to the complexity of what they are saying, how much risk is involved and whether it is frequently practiced language that is a classroom expectation. This is also dependent on the time of the year, as at the beginning of the year, students are just coming off of summer vacation so they are rewarded for most of what they say in French. As the year progresses, it becomes increasingly difficult to gain more marbles. As their French develops, so do my expectations – both in quantity and in quality.

Francocraft
Another system that I have in my classroom is Francocraft. I developed this system based on my students’ love for Minecraft. This system tracks how much French students speak on a daily basis. All students start at Level 1 (Niveau 1), which is the grass level – to represent the grass in the game Minecraft. In Minecraft, characters dig below the surface to find different stones and gems. As students speak more French, they break through the grass level to get to the dirt level. The more French, they speak, the higher the level they will attain. Each level represents a different aspect from the game – the higher the level they are, the rarer the gem they are. I track their progress with a game board in the classroom that is always displayed. Their levels are displayed with actual items that represent the grass/dirt/gems from the game Minecraft. They move up in levels gradually as the year goes on, depending on the amount of marbles they win. Therefore, if a student speaks frequently in French, that student will receive marbles, which in turn increases his/her level in Francocraft.





Petit Profs 

Once students have demonstrated a strong commitment to the language by making a concerted effort to always speak in French with the teacher and their peers, thereby helping to create a truly French environment, then they are awarded the distinction of Petit Prof. This distinction is only provided to those who have achieved the highest level in Francocraft, which is the Emerald level. Becoming a Petit Prof entitles the student to certain privileges but also requires some extra responsibilities as well. Petit Profs are identified by either a bracelet or a necklace that says Petit Prof and these students chose our weekly P.A.T. game. P.A.T. stands for Preferred Activity Time and is a part of Fred Jone’s Positive Classroom Discipline, which I follow in my classroom. The class earns P.A.T. through their positive behaviour. During P.A.T, we play a game that reinforces what we are learning in class. The Petit Profs are given a selection to choose from and vote on which activity they would like for the class to do during P.A.T. As part of their responsibilities, which they accept once they become a Petit Prof, they are also required to provide assistance to students who need help speaking French. When students need help speaking in French, they are advised to seek out a Petit Prof as a resource before coming to the teacher for assistance.

La pioche diamant – Diamond Pickaxe
Each week, the diamond pickaxe – pioche diamant is awarded to one Petit Prof who has demonstrated exceptional dedication to helping his/her peers in any way he/she can. In addition to it being a high honour to receive this award, the student can actually carry the pioche diamant with him/her for the day as a trophy and trade it in at the end of his/her time in French class for their chose between various different rewards.

Rules in French Class

We always discuss the rules for our classroom and these can be summed up into five simple rules. I have created a poster with these rules, that I get printed up as a black and white engineering print at Staples for less than $3.00. I encourage my students to speak as much French as possible, all the time. To be clear, I teach a 50% French Immersion program and am currently teaching two classes every day. I teach French, Social Studies (in French), Visual Arts (in French), and Drama (in French) to one class, while the other class is receiving their English instruction and then we swap classes halfway through the day.
Although I expect students to use French as much as possible, I understand that students enter my class of varying abilities so I do try to provide a lot support so that my students know what to do if they don't understand something or if they need help saying something in French. We review strategies for speaking and listening in French. I have a poster set from PosterPals that has served as a great visual reference for my students. We go through the strategies with modelling and practice saying the different sayings that they can use so that students become familiar with what to do, where to look for help, what to say and how to say it. 



In addition to the posters on the wall, I created my own "Feuille de référence French Class Reference Sheet" that contains the most frequently used questions and objects so students can easily access them. I place these on their desks/tables. 

I do spend some time at the beginning of the year going over routines and how my classroom works. I introduce the Strategies to Maximize Communication in French. (See that blog post to learn more). 

Setting Up My Classroom in September

A lot of teachers ask me about how I run my classroom so I figured it was finally time to do a blog post about it. Seeing as it's almost September, I'll lay out how I set things up and how I explain how my classroom works to my students. I believe that a strong foundation in oral French is essential and that learning French should be fun. These beliefs are very evident in everything I do and that you see in my classroom.

One of the first things I explain to my students is "Les six étapes del'aquisitation d'une langue seconde", which is a poster that I made based on my understandings and beliefs about how you learn a second language. I get this printed up as a poster at Staples for around $15.00 because I like it best in colour format.




We always discuss the rules for our classroom and these can be summed up into five simple rules. I have created a poster with these rules, that I get printed up as a black and white engineering print at Staples for less than $3.00. I encourage my students to speak as much French as possible, all the time. To be clear, I teach a 50% French Immersion program and am currently teaching two classes every day. I teach French, Social Studies (in French), Visual Arts (in French), and Drama (in French) to one class, while the other class is receiving their English instruction and then we swap classes halfway through the day.



Although I expect students to use French as much as possible, I understand that students enter my class of varying abilities so I do try to provide a lot support so that my students know what to do if they don't understand something or if they need help saying something in French. We review strategies for speaking and listening in French. I have a poster set from PosterPals that has served as a great visual reference for my students. We go through the strategies with modelling and practice saying the different sayings that they can use so that students become familiar with what to do, where to look for help, what to say and how to say it. 




In addition to the posters on the wall, I created my own "Feuille de référence French Class Reference Sheet" that contains the most frequently used questions and objects so students can easily access them. I place these on their desks/tables. 


I do spend some time at the beginning of the year going over routines and how my classroom works. I introduce the Strategies to Maximize Communication in French. (See that blog post to learn more). 


At this point, it's time to have some fun, because, after all, that's one of my central tenants about teaching French. I usually break out one of my games; two of my favourite games for the beginning of the year (or any time, really) are "Pige dans le lac" and "Qui suis-je". They are both available for download for FREE from our TpT page. We were inspired by Nadine Pharand's version of Pige dans le lac and with her permission, added some language structures to facilitate increased oral communication in French. Pige dans le lac has students practice asking and answering questions with the verb avoir; it is the game "Go Fish" in French. It was such a hit with our students that we ended up making "Qui suis-je", which is a slightly different, but also easy to play card game that has students use the verb "être". 


*A quick note but important note about the games we make.* We aim to create enough copies of each game so that the whole class can be playing with a partner at one time. This allows us to easily transition from modelling the game and having the class play with us, to students playing in pairs and the teacher moving around to provide support where needed. It's easy for a teacher to parachute in on the game play. 


I make sure buy enough packs of cards for the class to play in partners, print and laminate the reference sheets and buy soap containers from Dollarama to hold the packs of cards. I label each set of cards with a number so that lost cards can be returned to the correct deck and the number is also labelled on the soap box. 


Another game that I play during the first week is one that we created called "Questions au hasard", which is a French speaking game. I print off and laminate enough copies for the whole class to work in partners and each pair to have a copy of the game so that we can all play at one time. First, we play as a class and I pull up a PDF version of the game on the Smartboard and I use a giant die that I bought from Dollarama and I model how to play the game. We play a few rounds together before the students play with a partner. I like to play this particular game because there is a lot of structure so it is easy for students to figure out the format and there is also a lot of scaffolding so students who need assistance have access to support, while those who don't can generate their own questions and answers. 


Another thing that I go over at the beginning of the year is my homework expectations. My at-home reading program consists of students reading three times a week for at least 10 minutes in French, completing a reading response in French once a week, visiting my class website once a week (to play some French literacy-based games or watch some YouTube videos in French), as well as studying our mots de la semaine (which they can do from the website). I put together a package with the expectations, language structures and sentence starters for the reading response as well a sample response, and pages for tracking the reading and reading responses in a duotang labelled Journal de lecture. The reading log pages and reference sheets are available on my TpT store. 


For the Mots de la semaine, each week I introduce five new French vocabulary words that students practice at home. Each Friday, we do a Clicker Quiz with multiple choice questions based on these words. There are three different types of questions that I typically have on these quizzes: identifying if the word is spelled correctly, a fill in the blank sentence, with students having to select the word of the week that makes the most sense, and a statement containing one of the words of the week and students are asked if this sentence makes sense or not (is the word used in the correct context). Instead of just focusing on who is getting the responses correct or not, I instead use this as a learning opportunity and also use this as a speaking and listening assessment. Students can work with a partner during the Clicker Quiz and they are encouraged to work together. Students take turns explaining which answer they think is correct and provide some reasoning. We use this reference chart that I created to help facilitate discussion. Once one partner has explained his her thinking, the other partner must explain if he or she agrees with that line of thinking and why. This quiz ends up facilitates lots of discussions, while also stressing the listening and comprehension component. It also demands that students take a position on something and defend their position. They become well-versed in how to justify their thoughts. My wife does the same thing in her class, except that she uses Kahoot instead of clickers and we use the same anchor chart for both classes.

Here's what my class looks like at the beginning of this September:

Why you should be playing more games in French


Speaking French

On my Strategies for Speaking French page, I've outlined some of the strategies that I have put in place in order to encourage my students to speak French. Honestly, one of the best strategies that I've put in place is to make learning French fun. In order to promote speaking and listening, my students play a lot of games in French. 


Why play games?


If kids find the games fun, then they want to play them. And in my classroom, I use games that specifically encourage students to be speaking and listening. We don't play silent games in French class. At first, I did a lot of speaking activities but I found that students were much more motivated and desired to speak French more if there was a game element added to the activity. For example, I used to do the activity "Questions au hasard" with my students and while it is a good activity, I noticed that students didn't seem very excited about doing it. That was because there was no end goal besides just speaking French. I added in a score sheet and created a few simple rules to turn it into more of a game and noticed a big difference in how it was being received with my students.


Introducing Games


Whenever I introduce a new game, I project a reference sheet or the game up on the Smartboard and gather the students around the game and go through the instructions (using student-friendly language in French) and by modelling the rules. Then I play the game with the class. Next I have students break out into pairs and EVERYONE plays the game with a partner at the same time. 


I go from group to group to listen in on their conversations and to offer assistance and feedback if needed. When I notice that students are doing a good job or putting forth a great effort, I reward that with a "billet".


I use these French behaviour tickets to reward positive behaviour. Students may exchange these "billets" for three "billes" (see "Les billes - marbles" for more details) or some extra time for P.A.T. for the class.  

As I mentioned in another blog post, I find it important to create enough copies of the games so that everyone can play at the same time. This allows me to easily notice who needs support and how students are handling the game. It always affords me an opportunity to see how I might tweak the game if need be. Aside from purchased cards (UNO, decks of cards, flashcards), I laminate all of my games (game boards, score trackers, reference sheets), so that they can be used year after year. 


I created a reference sheet with commonly used phrases when playing games that I introduce and use with my students when they are playing games so that everything can be done in French. 
After we have played the games enough that students are familiar with them, we play them in Game Centers, with French buddies, and when students have completed work early.



Where do I get my games? 


I have created most my games myself (or with my wife). It has taken hours and hours to create these games, as we aim to make them fun but also functional in helping students to improve their French. Most of them are available in our TeachersPayTeachers store (some are a free download, some are not). We have purchased a few of our games from other vendors - if you click on the title of each game, it will take you to where you can buy that game. 
It does take a long time to actually physically produce them, especially since I like to have a class set of everything. It costs money to print in colour (thank goodness Ontario teachers who are Edvantage members now have a 10% discount off of certain printing services at Staples - see the deal through Edvantage), it takes time to cut everything out, laminate it and cut it out again. I suggest you buy a good paper trimmer and a good laminator. We like 5mm laminating pouches the best and buy ours from Walmart. We often put on Netflix in the background while we make our games. HOWEVER, it is completely worth the effort. Once you've made them, then you have them forever. My students highly enjoy playing games, so they enjoy speaking French. I try to package my games so that they all fit neatly into pencil cases or soap boxes that go into specific bins from Dollarama so everything looks nice and orderly. This is a picture of just part of my games wall. 


What games do I use and how do I use them?



Games to get students speaking: 


UNO Card Game: 
Materials for a class of 20 students: -6 decks of UNO cards (can buy from many locations - Dollarama, Walmart, etc)

-6 reference sheets
-Students play in groups of 3-4.

I purchased my card sets from Walmart and labelled each card set with a unique number and bought containers from the Dollarama to hold the cards (since soap containers were not big enough for the UNO decks). I created a simple reference sheet for my students that included phrases such as "J'ai un # (couleur)." "Manque ton tour." "Je change la couleur à (nouvelle couleur)." My rule is that you cannot play silently, you must tell your partner what you are doing every time you play a card or pick up a card. 

Pige dans le lac (Go Fish) 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 decks of cards (numbered so that lost cards can be returned to the correct deck and stored in a numbered soap container)
-10 reference sheets

- Students play in pairs.

Students practice asking questions with the verb "avoir". They also review their basic numbers in French. I created this reference page to help support more speaking in French while students are playing the game. 

Qui suis-je (Guessing Game) 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 decks of cards (numbered so that lost cards can be returned to the correct deck and stored in a numbered soap container)
-10 reference sheets

- Students play in pairs. 

Students pretend to be a number and try to guess who their partner is (what number they have), using the the verb "être". They are also practicing basic numbers and numeration in French with "higher than" and "lower than" phrases in French. I created this game after I saw how much my students loved playing "Pige dans le lac". 

Questions au hasard 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 game boards 
-24 BINGO chips per game board (I store mine in plastic baggies from the Dollarama and buy the BINGO chips from Walmart)
-20 score cards (1 per player) 
-10 dice (1 per game)

- Students play in pairs. This is the game that started out as a speaking activity that we created but then we modified it into a game. Students take turns asking and answering questions. As they answer questions, they fill up a score sheet, which has two slots per question. The first person to have their score sheet completed wins.
This has students practice asking "est-ce que" questions with the verbs "pouvoir", "vouloir", "aimer", "avoir", "être" and "préférer". Each question is started but students need to actually come up with what they are asking. There are many stems and possible ways suggested for students to complete the question, which gives to support to those who need it. Students are not required to use those examples. 
Students also practice how to answer the question in a complete sentence and there is a "parce que" stem to encourage students to justify their answers. 
I also have versions that practice "qu'est-ce que" questions, intonation, and inversion, as well as a question variety pack (comment, quand, quel/quelle, combien, où, and qui questions) and a futur proche & passé composé (with the verbs aller, visiter, and faire). I love how much differentiation is available with this game. Students of all levels can access this game so that it suits their needs and challenges them at the right level. Some students might just be working on asking questions using the support stems and answering them in a complete sentence without the "parce que". Other students may just be using the question starters but coming up with their own unique endings and answering questions with detailed justifications of their answers. 

I start out giving the students regular dice and if they are on task, I will promote them larger dice. I have three sizes in total. 

Le défi français 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 game sets
-20 player tokens (1 per player) 
-10 dice (1 per game)

- Students play in pairs. 


This is a board game that I created that involves all the great elements of a board game - a special "track" on the board, with some twists and turns, question cards (of varying difficulty, worth different point values), and chance cards (that affect players). I currently have made three versions of this game - it is DEFINITELY a class favourite! It promotes so much speaking. Each game has 30 different easy questions and 10 different hard questions. The questions vary from version to version and the game mechanics change in the different versions as well. I am currently working on version 4 at the moment. 

Connectez les mots
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 packages of English-French flashcards from Canadian Curriculum Press (we bought them at Staples)
-10 game boards
-40 BINGO chips per game (20 of one colour and 20 of a different colour)
- Students play in pairs. 


My wife bought these flashcards at Staples and didn't know what she could do with them since they show a picture of what's on the reverse side. We both liked the cards and thought it would be a great way to introduce/review French vocabulary so I came up with the idea to use them in a "Connect 4" type of game. I created a game board with the words all typed out. Students lay down the cards and select a card that is face up by saying it's name. If they are correct, they get to place a BINGO chip on that square on the game board and the card is flipped over so that the image on the reverse is revealed and the turn is over. If the guess is incorrect *to verify, the students flip over the card as the answer is on the back corner*, that turn ends.  You can play to see who can get the most chips on the board, or who can create as many four-in-a-row as possible. It's a great way to expose students to more vocabulary.

Spot it (Basic French) 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-6 games of Spot it! (I refer to the game as "Trouve-le")
-optional: I made a reference page for this and print of 10 copies of the reference page to go with the game.

- Students play in groups of 3-4. 
I teach my students how to play each of the different versions of Spot it!, we play it in French. Instructions are included with the game. My students really enjoy this game and as an added bonus it exposes them to 57 French vocabulary words. 








Games to help students with French sounds/French reading:


Les mots fréquents 

Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 sets of Les mots fréquents

I have made High Frequency Word lists for Grade 1, 2 and 3 French Immersion, each containing 100 words: 100 high frequency cards for Level 1 (Grade 1 French Immersion), 100 high frequency cards for Level 2 (Grade 2 French Immersion), and 100 high frequency cards for Level 3 (Grade 3 French Immersion). Each level has 5 sub-sets of cards: A, B, C, D, and E. Each sub-set of cards contains 20 different high frequency words. The file for each level contains two copies of each sub-set, which is what you need in order to play the games as the goal of each game is to make pairs of the same word. 

Students learn 300 new high frequency words in French through four fun games with these double-sided flashcards. Reference sheets are included for each game so the students can play them all in French These are AMAZING and are helping my students learn their high frequency words in a fun, hands-on way. 

La course des voyelles
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 game sets
     -Each set has :
     -100 cards in total (20 cards per vowel sound)
     -game board
     -hint or “indices” trackers (each tracker contains 6 slots for tokens)
     -2 sided reference sheet (side 1: title page side 2: all pictures and words for each vowel sound)
-10 dice (1 per game)
-10 player tokens (1 per player)
-hint tokens (6 per player – this could be counters/chips)

Here is a game that I created to practice French vowel sounds, while also building/reviewing vocabulary. Students roll to advance along the game board, drawing cards of images and identifying the vocabulary it represents. Students have a reference sheet to use if they need it, but they have a limited number of times they can use it for help. There is exposure to over 100 different French words through this one game!
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-20 BINGO cards
-Smart Notebook Interactive Bingo word caller (or caller sheet (to cut out individual words to call) and tracking sheet to keep track of the words called)
- BINGO chips (many)
-We play as a class.

I created this game to help my students practice their sounds, but to also introduce/review French vocabulary. Each game focuses on the sound a specific sound, with 24 different vocabulary words that contain that sound. I made BINGO games for 10 sounds in total. Every word is on every card, but no two cards are the same, so students are engaged every time a word a called as they search to find the word on their card. 






Serpents et échelles
 

Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 copies of Serpents et échelles des syllabes (from Littératout)
     - each set contains 1 game board and a set of easy syllable cards and a set of more difficult syllable cards
-20 game tokens (1 per player)

-10 dice (1 per game)
-Students play in pairs.

I found this game on Littératout (which requires a paid subscription) and my students really liked it. I ended up creating a slightly different game board because I found that the Snakes & Ladder board game from their site didn't facilitate very long games. However, the syllable cards are great! Students roll a dice and before they can advance, they have to draw a syllable card and read it out loud (they can choose an easy one or a difficult one). Once they have read it, they can advance to the space that they rolled.  It's a great way to refine pronunciation as well as improve reading skills. 
Our version of the board is available here
La course à dix 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 game boards
-20 BINGO chips per game board (I store mine in plastic baggies from the Dollarama and buy the BINGO chips from Walmart)
-ten 12-sided dice (1 per game- we purchased from a local gaming store)

- Students play in pairs. 

I created this game to help my students continue to practice their sounds in a fun way. It's a sound-word association game with some risk involved! Students try to fill up their score card first but have to be careful because there is always a risk that the other player could remove some of their chips. Each game board has three different ways of playing the game and features 10 different sounds.





La tour française 
Materials for a class of 20 students: 
-10 sets of tumbling blocks (from Dollarama but could be from anywhere, Jenga works too)
  -I divide the number of blocks by 7 and number them equally from 1 to 7. 
-20 stories (I print enough copies so that there are two copies of the story per tower so that students don't need to share their story)

-Students play in pairs.
I created this game as an engaging way to practice reading comprehension, as well as active listening. Students pick a block, answer a question about a French text and keep the block (as a point) if they answered correctly. We made four unique stories and each story has 14 comprehension questions. The answers can all be found in the text. If the answer is not correct, the block must be returned to the top of the tower. My students really love to play this game!







Writing Activity 

While this is not a game, this is an activity that I do with my students once they have been playing our oral communication games so that they can practice their writing.  

Check out this blog post to learn more. 









Speaking Activity

Here is a link to my blog post about this easy speaking and listening activity!








BINGO as a Speaking & Listening Game

Here is a link to my blog post about how I've made BINGO a speaking activity!




Please check back as I am always adding to this list and I still have games in my classroom that I use to add to this post. If you have any games that you think I should be using, or that you would like to see created, please send me an email at kurtisandamandahartnell@gmail.com . Thanks for reading!